Graduate Students: Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism

Below are some useful sources of information on avoiding plagiarism from colleges and universities.

What is Plagiarism?

When you use other's ideas and words without giving them credit, you are plagiarizing their work. The University of Utah Student Code defines plagiarism, along with cheating, as academic misconduct:

University of Utah Policy 6-400: Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities (“Student Code”), Section I. B. 2.:

1.  “Academic misconduct” includes, but is not limited to, cheating, misrepresenting one's work, inappropriately collaborating, plagiarism, and fabrication or falsification of information, as defined further below. It also includes facilitating academic misconduct by intentionally helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic misconduct.

 a.  “Cheating” involves the unauthorized possession or use of information, materials, notes, study aids, or other devices in any academic exercise, or the unauthorized communication with another person during such an exercise. Common examples of cheating include, but are not limited to, copying from another student's examination, submitting work for an in-class exam that has been prepared in advance, violating rules governing the administration of exams, having another person take an exam, altering one's work after the work has been returned and before resubmitting it, or violating any rules relating to academic conduct of a course or program.

b.  Misrepresenting one's work includes, but is not limited to, representing material prepared by another as one's own work, or submitting the same work in more than one course without prior permission of both faculty members.

c. “Plagiarism” means the intentional unacknowledged use or incorporation of any other person's work in, or as a basis for, one's own work offered for academic consideration or credit or for public presentation. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, representing as one's own, without attribution, any other individual’s words, phrasing, ideas, sequence of ideas, information or any other mode or content of expression.

d. “Fabrication” or “falsification” includes reporting experiments or measurements or statistical analyses never performed; manipulating or altering data or other manifestations of research to achieve a desired result; falsifying or misrepresenting background information, credentials or other academically relevant information; or selective reporting, including the deliberate suppression of conflicting or unwanted data. It does not include honest error or honest differences in interpretations or judgments of data and/or results.

Plagiarism

Four zany, but informative, videos on plagarism from Paul Robeson Library, Rutgers University.

Plagiarism II

Plagiarism III

Plagiarism IV

Librarian

Marie Paiva's picture
Marie Paiva
Contact:
Graduate and Undergraduate Services

Marriott Library

295 East 1500 South

University of Utah

Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0860

USA
Email: marie.paiva@utah.edu
801.585.7870
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