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Pre-Law LEAP Fall 2020

The purpose of this course is to explore the meaning of community, especially as it relates to the American community as a whole and communities within the United States, and the relation of law to community.

Subject Specialist

Rebekah Cummings's picture
Rebekah Cummings
Contact:
J Willard Marriott Library
295 South 1500 East
Digital Matters Lab
801-581-7701
Skype Contact: @RebekahCummings

LEAP Professor

Dr. Ann Engar

Sill 146

801-581-4891

ann.engar@utah.edu

Citation Managers

Everyone at the University of Utah is eligible for an account on EndNote Web. You can either access it at http://www.myendnoteweb.com The very first time you login you will need to be at the University of Utah IP address (on campus).

Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh] is a free, easy-to-use tool to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources.

Sign up for your free account

 

In Class Exercise

We are going to evaluate different websites in groups of 3. Use the CRAAP test and be prepared to share your observations. 

Group 1 - The Volokh Conspiracy

Group 2 - Vote Save America

Group 3 - Popehat

Group 4 - Politifact

Group 5 - IP Watchdog 

Group 6 - Skeptical Science

Group 7 - Law 360

Group 8 - The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus

Group 9 - Above the Law

Web Evaluation - The CRAAP Test

Currency: The timeliness of the information.

  • When was the information published or posted?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Does your topic require current information, or will older sources work as well?
  • Are the links functional? 

Relevance: The importance of the information for your needs.

  • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?
  • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)?
  • Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?
  • Would you be comfortable citing this source in your research paper?

Authority: The source of the information.

  • Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor?
  • What are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations?
  • Is the author qualified to write on the topic?
  • Is there contact information, such as a publisher or email address?
  • Does the URL (.com .edu .gov .org .net) reveal anything about the author or source? 

Accuracy: The reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the content.

  • Is the information supported by evidence?
  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?
  • Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge?
  • Does the language or tone seem unbiased and free of emotion?
  • Are there spelling, grammar or typographical errors?

Purpose: The reason the information exists.

  • What is the purpose of the information? Is it to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?
  • Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?
  • Is the information fact, opinion, or propaganda?
  • Does the point of view appear objective and impartial?
  • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases? 

Grounding Principles

Information Has Value 

Research as Inquiry

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Scholarship as Conversation

Searching as Strategic Exploration

Evaluating Websites and Blogs - Research Resources

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