: :From Grimm to Disney: the birth of the modern fairy tale (GERM 3750/CLCS 3900): :

Examines fairy tales in literature and film from 17th to 21st century, with particular focus on tradition of rewriting folk tales - the Grimms' rewriting of older French and Italian folk and fairy tales and Disney's rewriting of the Grimms' fairy tales.

Beginning your search for sources

The library's catalog Usearch is a good place to begin, since it searches not only the physical resources held in the library but also over 380 packages of online resources (including journals and e-books). Most of the articles that show up in search results from our catalog should have the full text available, usually as a pdf. Those that don't provide full text can be requested through Interlibrary Loan. To find articles beyond the scope of the journal packages searched by our catalog the first stop would be our databases. For the topics touched on by this class the best places to start would be the Modern Language Association (MLA) International Bibliography, the Film and Television Literature Index, Communication & Mass Media Complete (CMMC), International Bibliography of Theatre & Dance with Full Text and Music Database. One way to go deeper in your search for both books and articles would be to read through the sources cited by someone who has written a master's thesis or doctoral dissertation closely related to the topic of your research. You can do this using the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database. For instance, the 2018 master's thesis The witch, the blonde, and the cultural "other": applying cluster criticism to Grimm and Disney princess stories, by Valerie F. Garza, has five and a half pages of sources, while the 1997 doctoral dissertation Aging with Disney: depiction of gender and age in seven Disney animated fairy tales, by Carole J. Hannon, has 23 pages of sources.

Another effective way to search for scholarly resources that may or may not be available in our collections (but that may still be available through Interlibrary Loan) is to use Google Scholar. In order to take advantage of your affiliation with the University of Utah you should first take these steps: 1) click on the three horizontal lines in the upper left corner of the page 2) click on Settings/icon of the cogwheel 3) click on Library links 4) put Utah in the search box and click on the magnifying glass 5) click in the box in front of University of Utah - Get It @ UU, then click on Save. 

Physical books at the Marriott Library

Unfortunately, due to the current COVID-19 situation, the Marriott Library is closed and won't reopen until April 4th at the earliest. That means the physical books below are not available. But you will note that a number of them are available as e-books. It may be possible for us to obtain e-book versions of some of those that are currently only available in physical format. Please let me know if there are titles on this list that you would be interested in consulting in e-book format.

The books related to the topics covered by this class are distributed over three levels of the Marriott Library. Bear in mind that if a book you are interested in is currently checked out, you can recall it from circulation by clicking on the Request link (which will only show up if you are logged in through CIS). Some sample titles:

On the east side of Level 2:

GR55.G75 P37 2005 Clever maids: the secret history of the Grimm fairy tales, by Valerie Paradiz╠î [also available as an e-book]

GR161.F73 2013 French fairy tales: essays on a major literary traditionedited by Denyse Delcourt

GR166.D65 1999 Tales and translation: the Grimm tales from pan-Germanic narratives to shared international fairytales, by Cay Dollerup [also available as an e-book]

GR166.K5613 2012 Fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm: a new English version, edited by Philip Pullman

GR550.B33 1997 Postmodern fairy tales: gender and narrative strategies, by Cristina Bacchilega [also available as an e-book]

GR550.B648 2009 Fairy tales: a new history, by Ruth B. Bottigheimer [also available as an e-book]

GR550.F24 2004 Fairy tales and feminism: new approaches, edited by Donald Haase

GR550.F284 2009 Fairy tales reimagined: essays on new retellings, edited by Susan Redington Bobby

GR550.F68 1997 Archetypal patterns in fairy tales, by Marie-Louise von Franz [also available as an e-book]

GR550.S76 2008 Some day your witch will come, by Kay Stone

In the compact shelving on the east side of Level 1:

PN1995.9.F34 F35 2010 Fairy tale films: visions of ambiguity, edited by Pauline Greenhill and Sidney Eve Matrix [also available as an e-book]

PN1995.9.H6 R35 2007 Grimm pictures: fairy tale archetypes in eight horror and suspense films, by Walter Rankin

PN3437.T47 2009 Marvelous geometry: narrative and metafiction in modern fairy tale, by Jessica Tiffin [also available as an e-book]

PQ1877.J66 2016 Mother Goose refigured: a critical translation of Charles Perrault's fairy tales, by Christine A. Jones

PQ4165.M34 2008 Fairy-tale science: monstrous generation in the tales of Straparola and Basile, by Suzanne Magnanini [also available as an e-book]

In regular shelving on the east side of Level 1:

PS153.M33 B76 2007 Brothers & beasts: an anthology of men on fairy tales, edited by Kate Bernheimer

PS374.Y6 H83 1999 American young adult novels and their European fairy-tale motifs, by Lucia Huan [text also available online]

PS595.F32 P64 2003 The poets' Grimm: 20th century poems from Grimm fairy tales, edited by Jeanne Marie Beaumont and Claudia Carlson

PT921.K5613 2004 The annotated Brothers Grimm, edited by Maria Tatar

PT921.K84 2005 Terrors of childhood in Grimms' fairy tales, by W.G. Kudszus

On the north side of Level 3 you will find many individual fairy tales and collections, part of our Juvenile Collection. These include straight retellings, tales retold from a different point of view or set in a different time or place, even mashed together.

372.412 D1535pr Pretty Salma: a Little Red Riding Hood story from Africa, by Niki Daly

398.2 A7866pe Petite Rouge: a Cajun Red Riding Hood, by Mike Artell

398.2 B311o Old Neapolitan fairy tales, selected and retold from Il pentamerone by Rose Laura Mincieli

398.2 G864gr E5ma Grimm's grimmest, edited by Marisa Bulzone and Stefan Matzig

398.21 P497bas Petrosinella, a Neapolitan Rapunzel, by Giambattista Basile, adapted from the translation by John Edward Taylor

398.21 S5326ho Honestly, Red Riding Hood was rotten!: the story of Little Red Riding Hood as told by the wolf, by Trisha Speed Shaskan

398.21 S5627ja Jack: the true story of Jack and the beanstalkby Liesl Shurtliff

398.21 S5627re Red: the true story of Red Riding Hoodby Liesl Shurtliff

398.21 S5627ru Rump: the true story of Rumpelstiltskinby Liesl Shurtliff

813.6 G4532ta A tale dark & Grimm, by Adam Gidwitz

823.914 G1412sl The sleeper and the spindle, by Neil Gaiman

E-books

More and more of the books purchased by the library are e-books rather than physical volumes. Clicking on the link to an e-book in our catalog will prompt you to log in with your uNID and CIS password, even if you have already logged in. Some titles we have only as e-books:

Postmodern reinterpretations of fairy tales: how applying new methods generates new meanings, edited by Anna Kérchy

Once upon a time in the contemporary world: modern vision of old stories, edited by Elena Polyudova

The enchanted screen: the unknown history of fairy-tale films, by Jack Zipes

The irresistible fairy tale: the cultural and social history of a genre, by Jack Zipes

There are also records in our catalog for e-books that we don't yet own, the purchase of which is triggered by use. One example:

From fairy tale to film screenplay: working with plot genotypes, by Terence Murphy

Books not here at the library

The library's catalog includes records for books we do not yet own. These records say "MPDDA Click REQUEST PURCHASE to get a physical copy of book. On average requests take one to two weeks." In order to be able to request such a purchase you will be prompted to log in to your library account (even if you are already logged in through CIS) -- this is to ensure that only members of the University of Utah community are triggering purchases.

Even with a collection of over 4,000,000 items the library doesn't begin to have everything. The best single source to find books that aren't here, but that can be obtained through Interlibrary Loan, is the WorldCat (FirstSearch) database.

Again, due to the COVID-19 restrictions, it isn't currently possible for us to process requests for physical books, either as purchases or as interlibrary loans.

For assistance

Robert Behra's picture
Robert Behra
Contact:
Faculty Services Coordinator
Research and User Services
J. Willard Marriott Library
The University of Utah
295 S 1500 E
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0860

Office: 2110K

801-581-7694
fax: 801-581-3464
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